My Brown Wren

Jewelry and Mixed Media Art

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

229.00
Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Womens Suffrage Series by Tammi Sloan of My Brown Wren
Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Womens Suffrage Series by Tammi Sloan of My Brown Wren
Elizabeth Cady Stanton Pendant Back, Womens Suffrage Series by Tammi Sloan of My Brown Wren
Elizabeth Cady Stanton Pendant Back, Womens Suffrage Series by Tammi Sloan of My Brown Wren

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

229.00

Elizabeth Cady Stanton - was drawn to intellectual pursuits at an early age. She was an abolitionist and women’s activist who helped to pen, “The Declaration of Sentiments,” which marked the start of the women’s rights movement in the United States. It was delivered by Stanton at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848.

In 1950, Stanton met Susan B. Anthony and began to focus on the overall rights of women - not only the right to vote. But after the Civil War, Stanton again fought hard for a woman’s right to vote. In 1969, she and Anthony formed the National Woman Suffrage Association. They also co-wrote a newspaper, The Revolution, which drew attention to the struggles of women and promoted a more militant approach to enfranchisement.

This pendant is made from hand cut copper and vitreous enamel (ground glass). It has been fired in a kiln after each application of glass, decal and watercolor enamel. The image is permanent.

Dimensions:

Pendant is 2” tall by 1 7/16” wide. The chain is 18” long. The copper toggle is stamped with the words, “Votes for Women.” It is 1 1/4” long by 1/4” wide at the widest part. The silver hoop is approx. 5/8” in diameter.

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Elizabeth Cady Stanton - was drawn to intellectual pursuits at an early age. She was an abolitionist and women’s activist who helped to pen, “The Declaration of Sentiments,” which marked the start of the women’s rights movement in the United States. It was delivered by Stanton at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848.

In 1950, Stanton met Susan B. Anthony and began to focus on the overall rights of women - not only the right to vote. But after the Civil War, Stanton again fought hard for a woman’s right to vote. In 1969, she and Anthony formed the National Woman Suffrage Association. They also co-wrote a newspaper, The Revolution, which drew attention to the struggles of women and promoted a more militant approach to enfranchisement.

This pendant is made from hand cut copper and vitreous enamel (ground glass). It has been fired in a kiln after each application of glass, decal and watercolor enamel. The image is permanent.

Dimensions:

Pendant is 2” tall by 1 7/16” wide. The chain is 18” long. The copper toggle is stamped with the words, “Votes for Women.” It is 1 1/4” long by 1/4” wide at the widest part. The silver hoop is approx. 5/8” in diameter.