My Brown Wren

Jewelry and Mixed Media Art for the Eclectic Spirit

Alva Belmont

249.00
ava-belmont.jpg
ava-belmont2.jpg

Alva Belmont

249.00

This hand colored enameled photograph of Alva Belmont (image courtesy of The Library of Congress) depicts the colors of the Women’s Suffrage Movement in England. Alva Belmont fought both here, in the United States, and in England. She was a wealthy socialite, and benefactor of the National Woman’s Party.

Alva Belmont was married to William Kissam Vanderbilt for fourteen years, before she divorced and married Oliver Belmont. As part of the divorce, she was awarded a sizable settlement and a home in Newport, Rhode Island. With her wealth and assistance, Belmont sustained the efforts of the National Woman’s Party until her death in 1933. In 1916, she gave the NWP one half million dollars towards their efforts to raise awareness for women’s suffrage.

Belmont traveled to Europe, where she met Emmeline Pankhurst. It was evident to her that Pankhurt’s methods were more successful than the lobbying and peaceful protests that were the norm for the movement in the US. She brought Pankhurst to the United States for a speaking tour in 1913.

Belmont blazed the trail for all the women activists that came after her. When she died in 1933, her coffin was draped with a picket flag that bore the words, “Failure is Impossible.” We are still trying today, Alva, to raise awareness to the inequalities of women and other oppressed groups across the world.

This pendant is made from hand cut copper and vitreous enamel (ground glass). It has been fired in a kiln after each application of glass, decal and watercolor enamel. The image is permanent.

Dimensions:

Pendant is 2” tall by 1 7/16” wide. The chain is 18” long. The sterling silver toggle is stamped with the words, “Deeds Not Words.” It is 1 1/4” long by 1/4” wide at the widest part. The silver hoop is approx. 5/8” in diameter.

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This hand colored enameled photograph of Alva Belmont (image courtesy of The Library of Congress) depicts the colors of the Women’s Suffrage Movement in England. Alva Belmont fought both here, in the United States, and in England. She was a wealthy socialite, and benefactor of the National Woman’s Party.

Alva Belmont was married to William Kissam Vanderbilt for fourteen years, before she divorced and married Oliver Belmont. As part of the divorce, she was awarded a sizable settlement and a home in Newport, Rhode Island. With her wealth and assistance, Belmont sustained the efforts of the National Woman’s Party until her death in 1933. In 1916, she gave the NWP one half million dollars towards their efforts to raise awareness for women’s suffrage.

Belmont traveled to Europe, where she met Emmeline Pankhurst. It was evident to her that Pankhurt’s methods were more successful than the lobbying and peaceful protests that were the norm for the movement in the US. She brought Pankhurst to the United States for a speaking tour in 1913.

Belmont blazed the trail for all the women activists that came after her. When she died in 1933, her coffin was draped with a picket flag that bore the words, “Failure is Impossible.” We are still trying today, Alva, to raise awareness to the inequalities of women and other oppressed groups across the world.

This pendant is made from hand cut copper and vitreous enamel (ground glass). It has been fired in a kiln after each application of glass, decal and watercolor enamel. The image is permanent.

Dimensions:

Pendant is 2” tall by 1 7/16” wide. The chain is 18” long. The sterling silver toggle is stamped with the words, “Deeds Not Words.” It is 1 1/4” long by 1/4” wide at the widest part. The silver hoop is approx. 5/8” in diameter.

In 1889, Emmeline Pankhurst founded the Women's Franchise League.  It's main mission was to win the right to vote.  She also founded the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) in 1903.  It was known for it's more militant tactics like breaking windows and burning buildings.  At that time in history, property was more important than the lives of women.  Realizing this, Emmeline Pankhurst encouraged women to bring attention to their cause by any means.  She, along with at least 1000 of her followers, endured brutality by police and force feedings in prison.  They were willing to go as far as it took to raise attention for their cause. Though I'm not a proponent of violence or property destruction, it seemed at the time that property destruction was the only clear message that got the attention of those who could make a difference.