My Brown Wren

Jewelry and Mixed Media Art for the Eclectic Spirit

Susan B Anthony

219.00
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Susan B Anthony

219.00

Susan B. Anthony - was a political activist who was probably best known for her efforts towards the abolition of slavery. But after the end of the Civil War, Anthony began fighting for women’s rights. Together with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, she wrote, The Revolution, a weekly newspaper that lobbied for women’s rights. Anthony and Stanton would later go on to found the National Woman Suffrage Association.

Anthony was arrested in 1872 for voting illegally in the presidential election. She fought the charges and was fined $100, of which she never paid. She was an adamant believer in equal rights, willing to do what it took to get us there. She died fourteen years before the 19th amendment was ratified.

This pendant is made from hand cut copper. It has several layers of kiln fired vitreous enamel (ground glass) on both sides. Anthony’s image, courtesy of The Library of Congress, was applied using a waterslide decal. Waterslide decals are permanent once fired.

“Organize, Agitate, Educate,” along with Susan B. Anthony’s name, appears on the back of this pendant.

Dimensions:

Pendant is 2 3/4” wide by 1 1/2” tall. The chain is 18” long, and the copper toggle clasp is 1 3/16” long by 1/4” tall.

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Susan B. Anthony - was a political activist who was probably best known for her efforts towards the abolition of slavery. But after the end of the Civil War, Anthony began fighting for women’s rights. Together with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, she wrote, The Revolution, a weekly newspaper that lobbied for women’s rights. Anthony and Stanton would later go on to found the National Woman Suffrage Association.

Anthony was arrested in 1872 for voting illegally in the presidential election. She fought the charges and was fined $100, of which she never paid. She was an adamant believer in equal rights, willing to do what it took to get us there. She died fourteen years before the 19th amendment was ratified.

This pendant is made from hand cut copper. It has several layers of kiln fired vitreous enamel (ground glass) on both sides. Anthony’s image, courtesy of The Library of Congress, was applied using a waterslide decal. Waterslide decals are permanent once fired.

“Organize, Agitate, Educate,” along with Susan B. Anthony’s name, appears on the back of this pendant.

Dimensions:

Pendant is 2 3/4” wide by 1 1/2” tall. The chain is 18” long, and the copper toggle clasp is 1 3/16” long by 1/4” tall.

Christabel Pankhurst came from humble means, and believed, like her parents, in devotion to a cause over comfort.  She obtained a law degree in 1906 from the University of Manchester, but was unable to practice law because she was a woman.

Educated as she was, she was frustrated by the hypocrisy of the laws of England.  In 1905, Christabel and Annie Keeney (pictured left) were arrested for interrupting a Liberal Party meeting, unfurling a banner reading "Votes for Women."  Rather than pay the fine for their public protest, they were both sentenced to two months in prison. 
 

Peaceful protests like these were met with police brutality, government cover-ups and fake news.  The inhumane treatment of women who spoke out and spoke up for themselves gave birth to more militant tactics by groups like the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU).  It was clear that protests by peaceful means were not furthering the cause of women's enfranchisement.

We can look back on that time in history with disdain, or we can look at it for what it was - women had no power, were treated like second class citizens and were driven to desperate measures to get their point across.   

Despite the fact that today we have the right to vote, we are still being treated as less than our male counterparts.  Now is the time to wake up.  Now is the time to pay attention to what history can teach us and propel us forward with dignity and hope.